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Books by the Blogger:

IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY TWEET:
FIVE HUNDRED 1ST LINES IN 140 CHARACTERS OR LESS
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

READING HERODOTUS:
A GUIDED TOUR THROUGH THE WILD BOARS, DANCING SUITORS, AND CRAZY TYRANTS OF THE HISTORY
By Debra Hamel


paperback | Kindle | hardcover (US)
paperback | hardcover (UK)

THE MUTILATION OF THE HERMS:
UNPACKING AN ANCIENT MYSTERY
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

TRYING NEAIRA:
THE TRUE STORY OF A COURTESAN'S SCANDALOUS LIFE IN ANCIENT GREECE
By Debra Hamel


paperback | hardcover (US)
paperback | hardcover (UK)

PRISONERS OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

SOCRATES AT WAR:
THE MILITARY HEROICS OF AN ICONIC INTELLECTUAL
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

ANCIENT GREEKS IN DRAG:
THE LIBERATION OF THEBES AND OTHER ACTS OF HEROIC TRANSVESTISM
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

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Authors & publishers:
I've decided to stop accepting review copies. The downside of getting buried in free books is that reading increasingly becomes an obligatory act. After some seven years of blogging books, it's time for me to return to the simple pleasure of reading only the books I want to read, when I want to read them. The blog, however, will continue, and if you've got a good first line to share for TwitterLit please do so here.



  
From a random review:

  


April 2015: Book notices

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Joe Finder, Zero Hour

In this standalone thriller by Joe Finder, terrorist-for-hire Henrik Baumann is unleashed on the United States with instructions to bring down the world's financial markets. FBI Special Agent Sarah Cahill is the one we're rooting for on the other side. She's a veteran of the Lockerbie investigation and the mother of a young son, with a problematic ex-husband who causes trouble along the way. I always love reading about smart criminals, and Baumann is supposed to be the best, but he makes an awful lot of mistakes for all of his vaunted prowess. That he didn't shine as a criminal made this book fall short for me. The story also gets bogged down in too much detail. Still a decent read, but not edge-of-your-seat exciting.

March 2015: Book notices

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Stephen Carpenter, Killer

I love the main storyline of this book. Jack Rhodes is the author of a bestselling series of crime novels that focus on the murders of a mysterious serial killer. The killer has a gruesome M.O. that involves the beheading of his victims' corpses and the amputation of their hands. Jack's story starts when a corpse is found with eery similarities to the victim in his first book. It might have been a copycat killing if it weren't that the real-life murder pre-dated the book's publication. So, trouble ensues, and it's a good story.

The real-life killer's story alternates with Jack's. We learn about the abuse he suffered as a kid and how he came to find solace in the murder and mutilation of a series of women. This part I didn't like very much. I think it may have detracted from the book to let us know fairly early on that Jack was not in fact guilty of murder--he might have been, had the story played out differently, or his guilt or innocence might have been ambiguous. So we know that there's a real killer out there, and somehow that cheapens the story a bit. There remains a mystery--how did Jack come to be writing the books he writes, which seem to have real-life parallels, but that question is answered fully by the book's end. (I had initially thought that Jack would wind up on the run and trying to clear his name in the book's sequel, but I was wrong.) On the whole a good read, but I think it could have been better.

February 2015: Book notices

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Hy Conrad, Mr. Monk and the New Lieutenant

The stakes are unusually high in the latest Monk novel, because someone wants Captain Stottlemeyer dead. Monk and Natalie  have to figure out who's targeting him while dealing with a handful of distractions--a mysterious woman who hires Natalie for her divorce case, the hippie printers next door to their office, and an oafish new lieutenant who can't hold a candle to Amy Devlin, let alone Randy Disher. Eventually, inevitably, the case is solved, and you'll be surprised at the who and why behind the attempts on Stottlemeyer.

The bigger news, though, is that Mr. Monk and the New Lieutenant is slated to be the last Monk novel. Hy Conrad, who took over from Lee Goldberg three books ago, is leaving the series, and apparently no one else is stepping in to take over. For those of us who have read the Monk books religiously, this is very sad news. Conrad leaves the series in a good place. We can feel good about where the characters are at the book's end, but the conclusion also leaves things open so that someone could pick up the reins again in the future. Here's hoping.

January 2015: Book notices

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Lee Goldberg, My Gun Has Bullets

This early book by Lee Goldberg has elements that will be familiar to his readers: television references that betray the author's love for the medium, and a certain light, readability to his prose. It's not as good as Goldberg's more recent stuff, however. The characters are cartoony (the guy with hair implants, for example), or some of them, the plot a bit too farfetched (the pair of stunt men), and the story sometimes veers into excessive detail when it comes to discussions of the television schedules of the various networks. The lead character was enjoyable, however, and there are elements to like here as well--the love interest, the grande dame who is not what she seems.

December 2014: Book notices

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Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People

Dale Carnegie's book is the sort of thing you hear about all your life but never bother to pick up, because, I don't know, because it's just there. But I ran across it while hanging around Amazon the other day. It's got an enormous number of reviews (favorable reviews), so somebody's reading it, and looking at some of them my curiosity got the better of me. So what's the book like? Basically, Carnegie offers a lot of very good, common-sense advice, practices which, if followed, probably would do a lot to help you win friends and influence people. His advice could be summarized in a page or two, but not so as to make it stick. What he does is devote one short chapter to each of his tenets--things like, encourage other people to talk about themselves. And then he discusses this practice at length by giving a bunch of real-life examples in which following that advice helped someone out--these are people who took his classes or whose autobiogaphies he's read, for example. All of this is in very straightforward, down-to-earth prose, so it's very readable. The book is also interesting, unintentionally so, because it is to an extent dated. The advice is not dated, but the stories he tells of people who benefitted from it are from a different era, where men with hats were employed by typewriter companies and sent letters via the post to their business contacts. It's kind of charming.


About the blogger: Debra is the mother of two preternaturally attractive girls and the author of a number of books about ancient Greece, including Trying Neaira: The True Story of a Courtesan's Scandalous Life in Ancient Greece. She writes and blogs from her subterranean lair in North Haven, CT. Read more.

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  




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