Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner


The ratings:
5 stars  excellent
4 stars  very good
3 stars  good
2 stars  fair
1 stars  poor

Blog stats:

Navigate the site:

Books by the Blogger:

THE BATTLE OF ARGINUSAE :
VICTORY AT SEA AND ITS TRAGIC AFTERMATH IN THE FINAL YEARS OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

KILLING ERATOSTHENES:
A TRUE CRIME STORY
FROM ANCIENT ATHENS
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

READING HERODOTUS:
A GUIDED TOUR THROUGH THE WILD BOARS, DANCING SUITORS, AND CRAZY TYRANTS OF THE HISTORY
By Debra Hamel


paperback | Kindle | hardcover (US)
paperback | hardcover (UK)

THE MUTILATION OF THE HERMS:
UNPACKING AN ANCIENT MYSTERY
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

TRYING NEAIRA:
THE TRUE STORY OF A COURTESAN'S SCANDALOUS LIFE IN ANCIENT GREECE
By Debra Hamel


paperback | hardcover (US)
paperback | hardcover (UK)

PRISONERS OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

SOCRATES AT WAR:
THE MILITARY HEROICS OF AN ICONIC INTELLECTUAL
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

ANCIENT GREEKS IN DRAG:
THE LIBERATION OF THEBES AND OTHER ACTS OF HEROIC TRANSVESTISM
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY TWEET:
FIVE HUNDRED 1ST LINES IN 140 CHARACTERS OR LESS
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

Advertise: Rates & stats

Authors & publishers:
I've decided to stop accepting review copies. The downside of getting buried in free books is that reading increasingly becomes an obligatory act. After some seven years of blogging books, it's time for me to return to the simple pleasure of reading only the books I want to read, when I want to read them.



  
From a random review:

  

« McCall Smith, Alexander: At the Villa of Reduced Circumstances | Main | Leith, William: The Hungry Years »

Liparulo, Robert: Comes a Horseman

  

Printer-friendly page! Use print preview to see how this page will appear.

WestBow © 2005, 484 pages [amazon]
4.5 stars

The prelude to Robert Liparulo's Comes a Horseman is riveting: an assassin lies silently in the ventilation shaft of an embassy in Tel Aviv, waiting for his mark to enter the room below. An ingeniously choreographed execution and escape follow, but the significance of the murder isn't apparent until much later in the story. By that time the killer, Luco Scaramuzzi, will have become responsible for many more--and more terrible--deaths.

In one scene that is a powerful argument for women not living alone in remote locations we watch the murderer, a bear of a man decked out in animal skins, slaughter his fifth victim.Some five years later FBI agents Brady Moore and Alicia Wagner are called in to investigate a string of murders. The victims have nothing apparent in common other than the manner of their death: each was mauled by wolf-dog hybrids prior to being decapitated with an axe. In one scene that is a powerful argument for women not living alone in remote locations we watch the murderer, a bear of a man decked out in animal skins, slaughter his fifth victim.  His brutish lethality becomes even more alarming when this modern-day Norseman begins stalking Brady and his nine-year-old son. When Alicia finds herself almost simultaneously the target of another assassin, the two agents set off on their own--no longer willing to trust the FBI--to find out who is behind the attempts on their lives. Their pursuit plays out on an international stage, from the United States to Rome to Jerusalem.

Liparulo's novel is told from a number of perspectives--Luco Scaramuzzi's, the Norseman's, the victims', etc.--but it is primarily Brady and Alicia's story. He's a father and widower still grieving for his wife; she's unattached and hard-as-nails--married to her job, as we are told in one of the book's two (by my count) hackneyed expressions. (The other involves a rumpled suit jacket.) The book's plot is complex, the story at times keep-the-lights-on-scary. My one substantial complaint is that some two-thirds of the way in, after the reader has been frightened under the blankets more than once, the book's pace slows considerably for a large chunk of text, a roughly 70-page section in which Brady and Alicia absorb information from a wise advisor type they run across at the Vatican. The intel they receive is crucial, but it's unfortunate that its delivery is allowed to bring the story to a halt.

Liparulo's book, however, is well worth the read. Involving as it does the Catholic Church and an ancient religious conspiracy, reviewers will almost certainly liken it to The DaVinci Code. Dan Brown fans take note: you'll like this one. 

Tags: , , , ,

To read Haloscan comments on this post (from before the book-blog's move to TypePad from Blogger), click here. Please use the TypePad interface to add any new comments.
< Tweet it! | Reblog
https://www.book-blog.com/2005/11/comes_a_horsema.html
Book-blog.com reviews by Debra Hamel are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - Noncommercial - No Derivative Works 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

Comments




Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear on this weblog until the author has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In


About the blogger: Debra is the mother of two preternaturally attractive girls and the author of a number of books about ancient Greece, including Trying Neaira: The True Story of a Courtesan's Scandalous Life in Ancient Greece. She writes and blogs from her subterranean lair in North Haven, CT. Read more.

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  






The Sunday Salon.com



Book-blog.com by Debra Hamel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - Noncommercial - No Derivative Works 3.0 License.