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About the blogger:
Debra Hamel is the mother of two preternaturally attractive girls and the author of a number of books about ancient Greece. She writes and blogs from her subterranean lair in North Haven, CT. Read more.


Books by Debra Hamel:

THE BATTLE OF ARGINUSAE :
VICTORY AT SEA AND ITS TRAGIC AFTERMATH IN THE FINAL YEARS OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

KILLING ERATOSTHENES:
A TRUE CRIME STORY
FROM ANCIENT ATHENS
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

READING HERODOTUS:
A GUIDED TOUR THROUGH THE WILD BOARS, DANCING SUITORS, AND CRAZY TYRANTS OF THE HISTORY
By Debra Hamel


paperback | Kindle | hardcover (US)
paperback | hardcover (UK)

THE MUTILATION OF THE HERMS:
UNPACKING AN ANCIENT MYSTERY
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

TRYING NEAIRA:
THE TRUE STORY OF A COURTESAN'S SCANDALOUS LIFE IN ANCIENT GREECE
By Debra Hamel


paperback | hardcover (US)
paperback | hardcover (UK)

SOCRATES AT WAR:
THE MILITARY HEROICS OF AN ICONIC INTELLECTUAL
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

ANCIENT GREEKS IN DRAG:
THE LIBERATION OF THEBES AND OTHER ACTS OF HEROIC TRANSVESTISM
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)

IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY TWEET:
FIVE HUNDRED 1ST LINES IN 140 CHARACTERS OR LESS
By Debra Hamel


Kindle | paperback (US)
Kindle | paperback (UK)

PRISONERS OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR
By Debra Hamel


Kindle (US) | Kindle (UK)





Book-blog.com by Debra Hamel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - Noncommercial - No Derivative Works 3.0 License.



Book Notices | Drop Dead Healthy by A.J. Jacobs / The Pericles Commission by Gary Corby

A.J. Jacobs, Drop Dead Healthy: One Man's Humble Quest for Bodily Perfection

  Amazon  

I enjoyed A.J. Jacobs' survey of various health regimens, probably more than I expected to. The author is likeable, and I didn't find his approach to the material at all annoying (as a number of Amazon reviewers appear to). He writes a lot in the book about two family members, his grandfather and an eccentric aunt. While the aunt's stories are relevant--she's a somewhat wacko health nut--the grandfather stuff is tangential and could be omitted (though I understand why it's in there, given its importance to the author). The Kindle version includes a lengthy index that amounts to an enormous percentage of the book--perhaps 30%. This gave the impression that the book was endless. I read and read and there was still a huge percentage left. I think the index should be omitted from the digital version. There's really no need for it, and I didn't like having the percentage of text remaining so skewed.

Gary Corby, The Pericles Commission

  Amazon  

I very much like the idea of this series, a detective series set in 5th-century B.C. Athens. Nicolaos, the son of Sophroniscus, is a young man with political ambitions who becomes a sort of detective after he's the first on the scene of a murder. The murdered man turns out to be Ephialtes, a democratic reformer who really was murdered back in the day. In the book, the victim's colleague Pericles (yes, THAT Pericles) commissions Nicolaos to find Ephialtes' killer. Other personalities from the ancient world walk across Corby's pages--the priestess Diotima, Lysimachus, and Callias, for example. We'll also likely be hearing a lot more in the series from Nicolaos' little brother, a short and squat, precocious kid with the face of a satyr: Socrates. Yes, that Socrates. For those of you keeping track, Socrates and his dad are historical; Nicolaos is not. The book was well done, I thought. MY only reservation is that I got a little confused when it came to the resolution of the mystery. Perhaps I wasn't paying close enough attention. There was a lot of intrigue, and lots of names bandied about, and I wouldn't be able to tell you at the moment exactly who was responsible for Ephialties' death. Still, I like Nicolaos as a protagonist, and I enjoyed the world Corby created.

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